Ielts set work - deadline 6th December 2018

Your written assignment for 6th December is Writing 2 on page 90 of the Ielts Trainer book. Please write 250 words and hand your work in during the lesson on 6th December. I have included some notes about academic writing and please remember to use appropriate paragraphing. Please email me if you have any queries or ask me during the lesson on 29th November- Don't forget your books!

NOTES FOR WRITING 2 IELTS ACADEMIC WRITING WORD COUNT 250 WORDS.

POINTS TO REMEMBER

There is no set length for a paragraph, however very long paragraphs can be a difficult reading experience. Paragraphs should deal with one theme or idea. When the idea changes it is time to start a new paragraph.

 

Some words are overused in English and are not very precise if used in essays:

 

Words to avoid

Possible alternatives

Look

examine, consider, analyse, highlight

Says

states, defines, discusses, suggests, argues

Interesting

significant, important, pertinent

This shows

This suggests, an example of this is…, this confirms that

Some words are colloquial or used primarily in speech:

 

Words to avoid

Possible alternatives

Like

such as, for example, including

Nowadays

currently, today, at present

Down to

due to, as a result of, because, the reason for this is…

Back in the day

previously, in the nineteenth century, in the 1850s

Academic phrases to start sentences or paragraphs:

 

If you want to do the following in

your essay:

You could use these phrases:

1) Introduce the opposite point of view

Conversely

In contrast to X, X argues…..

On the other hand

Despite

However,

 

2) Add an extra example to your point

In addition

This also includes

This can also be applied to…

 

 

 

 

3) Compare or contrast two ideas  

While some……others argue  the point

differently by….

Although  ….

 

4) Lead your reader to a conclusion

Thus….

Therefore…

It can be argued that….

It is likely that….

In conclusion…

It can be concluded that…

 

5) Introduce something that does

not conform to the general rule

An exception to this is….

This is not the case for….

 

 

Structure, helpful expressions- build your vocabulary:

 

Expressing certainty – stating that something is obvious or definite

 

 

Adjectives:

certain

clear

obvious

undeniable

 

 

Adverbs:

 

 

certainly definitely unquestionably

 

 

clearly patently

incontrovertibly

 

 

obviously undoubtedly

 

 

undeniably unequivocally

 

 

Expressing doubt – stating that something may/not  be the case

 

 

Adjectives:

possible doubtful

(im)probable conceivable

(im)plausible uncertain

(un)likely debatable

 

 

Adverbs:

 

 

possibly arguably

 

 

probably maybe

 

 

plausibly perhaps

 

 

conceivably doubtfully

 

 

Remember that the modal verbs can and may are also widely used to express doubt, especially in their ‘past simple’ forms could and might.

It could be the case that…                              This might be true in some circumstances.

 

 

 

Using evidence – saying that something , especially  a graph  tells us something

 

 

Verbs:

demonstrate reveal

show suggest

indicate imply

prove signify

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expressing primacy – stating something is first or most important

 

 

Adjectives:

first principal

initial chief

primary key

main prime

 

 

Adverbs:

 

 

firstly principally

 

 

initially chiefly

 

 

primarily

 

 

mainly

 

 

 

Expressing sequence – saying something is second or next

 

 

Adverbs:

secondly besides

additionally (in addition) subsequently

furthermore next

In addition, it is important to…                              Furthermore, the process must… Besides this problem is the issue of…               

 

 

Determiner:        another e.g. Another key point is that…

 

 

 

Expressing finality – stating something is last or in conclusion

 

 

Adverbs:

lastly ultimately

finally

overall

altogether

 

 

Phrases:

 

 

In conclusion, it could be said that…

In summary, the three…

 

 

There are, therefore…

On the whole, then, there are…

 

 


Data di pubblicazione: 25/11/2018

Vai alla scheda del prof. Alexandra Cooper